Baseball and a New Brunch Place

01_Rockies Game
Last Friday Chris and I took advantage of his boss’s Rockies season tickets to take in our first baseball game at Coors Field. This was especially meaningful for us because the Rockies just happened to be playing … drum roll please … the Mets! Amazing.

And it was an amazing game, as well. (Go Mets!)

02_Rockies Game
On Sunday we decided to hit up Snooze (which is consistently ranked among the top places to get brunch in Denver). There are two locations near us — one in Union Station and another on Larimer. While the original plan was to get up early and head to the stand-alone restaurant on Larimer to hopefully avoid the (always present) crowds, let’s just say that didn’t happen because of someone (ahem … it was me. All my fault.), so we hit up the Union Station location instead, since there were places we could grab a coffee and hang out outside while waiting.

As a side note: I would highly recommend this course of action for anyone attempting to eat at Snooze on the weekend. We were told our wait would be an hour and 45 minutes (although I think it actually ended up only being a little over an hour), but we barely noticed because we grabbed coffee from Pigtrain and sat outside in the gorgeous weather watching the little kids and dogs run around in the water fountains.

Not too shabby.


04_Snooze Menu

05_Snooze Menu

06_Snooze Decor

Our waiter was some kind of wonderful. He felt pretty strongly that, since this was our first time at Snooze, we should get to experience some form of delicious pancakes, and because we both ordered from ‘the art of hollandaise’ section of the menu (hello, eggs benedict!), he sent one over for us to try on the house.

And it was … spectacular!

07_Snooze Pancake^^ Behold, the Blueberry Danish pancake, friends. Commence drooling now.

08_Snooze Bennie^^ Chris and I both picked the ‘Benny Due Can’t Decide?! option from the menu, which allows you to mix and match two half orders of eggs benedict options (mine, above, was the Caprese and Bella! Bella! Benny with the prosciutto removed).

All told, while I have to say that there will always be a special place in my heart for The Delectable Egg, I can certainly see why people say Snooze is a must-hit when in Denver. We’ll certainly be back here again in the near future, that’s for sure.

Bis bald, friends!

The 52 Project: August 17, 2015

FullSizeRender (82)^^ The past couple of weeks have by far been some of the most trying times in both my life and Chris’s. There’s nothing particularly fun or exciting to share from the past week, but what has been the lemonade of all these lemons is the generous outpouring of love and support we’ve received from friends and family. Case in point: some of the gorgeous flowers from above. Bis bald, friends — here’s to weeks that are looking up.

A Saturday Spent at Rocky Mountain National Park

Hey friends,

On Saturday, Chris and I hopped in the car and drove out to Rocky Mountain National Park, a 415 square mile park that encompasses some of the most beautiful landscape I’ve seen yet in Colorado — and that’s really saying something.

So to start, we decided to bite the bullet and purchase an America the Beautiful National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Annual Pass for $80. An individual car entrance for just one visit to Rocky Mountain National Park is $20, and we’ve already been to Arches National Park and have plans to visit Grand Teton National Park, Yellowstone National Park and Glacier National Park (we plan to visit Mount Rushmore as well, but there’s no fee to get in to see the monument there, and the parking fee isn’t covered by the annual pass) — so we figured it will probably be worth the cost.

Now let’s talk a little bit about the Trail Ridge Road, which was the first thing we tackled on our visit … holy cow, friends, it’s insane! From the park site:

Covering the 48 miles between Estes Park on the park’s east side and Grand Lake on the west, Trail Ridge Road more than lives up to its advanced billing. Eleven miles of this high highway travel above treeline, the elevation near 11,500 feet where the park’s evergreen forests come to a halt. As it winds across the tundra’s vastness to its high point at 12,183 feet elevation, Trail Ridge Road (U.S. 34) offers visitors thrilling views, wildlife sightings and spectacular alpine wildflower exhibitions, all from the comfort of their car.

The drive up to the visitor’s center is absolutely stunning, with plenty of places to pull off along the side of the road and gawk. If you’re lucky — like we were — you might even see tons of animals, like deer, marmot, groundhogs, squirrels and chipmunks and, our all-time favorite, the bighorn sheep.




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_DSC1488^^ Bighorn sheep! And if you look very closely, you can see a little groundhog trailing him …




While the views here are unlike any you’ll find anywhere else, you will need to pay attention to signs of altitude sickness. At over 12,000 feet in spots, I definitely wouldn’t recommend taking visitors here on their first day in Colorado. You’ll need to give yourself time to acclimate to the higher altitude, drink plenty of water and take things slowwwww. There’s no shame in taking your time on hikes around here — no one wants to have to deal with the effects of altitude sickness … blech!

Oh and one other word of wise — wear pants and bring a coat! Chris and I were total rookies and didn’t even think about the fact that high altitude brings chilly weather (we’re talking 50s and low 60s here, people), so we were forced to buy sweaters from the visitors center just to be able to make it through the rest of the day!

We took a couple of hours to see everything we wanted along the ride (I would recommend driving all the way up to the visitor’s center first, checking that out and doing the short little hike near the center, then driving back down to make your stops), and we even pulled over at one particularly gorgeous spot to stop and have some lunch we had packed. After we headed over to the super simple Bear Lake hike, which is only a .6 mile loops with no incline.


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We were going to attempt the Alberta Falls 1.2 mile hike, as well, but at that point we were getting a bit tired and felt like we had jam packed a lot into our first ever trip to Rocky Mountain National Park.

But don’t worry, Alberta Falls — now that we’ve got our annual pass, we’ll be back for ya!

Bis bald, friends!


The 52 Project: August 10, 2015

_DSC1509^^ This past weekend Chris and I headed about two hours northwest of Denver to check out Rocky Mountain National Park … and we had no idea what we were getting ourselves into. Holy crap it’s beautiful here, friends! I’ll be back later this week to talk more about everything we saw, but for now, feast your eyes on the beautifulness above (and yes, we did have to buy a jacket and sweatshirt from the gift shop because we were ill-prepared for the freezing cold weather that accompanies 12,000+ feet above sea level! Rookie mistake … ) Anyway, bis bald friends! Hope everyone had an amazing weekend.


The 52 Project: August 3, 2015

IMG_8021^^ Well, welcome to August, my friends. It’s crazy that we’re here already. This past weekend was relatively mild. We tried out a new restaurant (new to us, at least!), called Tamayo, with unlimited brunch plates and drinks, and we headed to Boulder on Sunday to watch one of Chris’s friends compete in the Iron Man competition there. Those people are so gosh darn inspiring. Bis bald, friends!


The Art of Asking Someone Else to Take Your Photo

Perfect_London_Pic^^ A perfectly framed London pic … because it was taken by someone else!

If you are anything like myself and Chris, there are many, many times in your traveling life where you’ll be forced to do one of three things:

  1. Ask someone to take a photo of you and your traveling partner.
  2. Take a selfie of yourself and your traveling partner.
  3. Use a camera timer to take a picture of you and your traveling partner.

For a long time, Chris and I avoided all three of these options and just switched off taking photos of each other in the places we were visiting, but I soon came to realize … that blows! I wanted both of us in these photos, so I was going to have to suck it up and figure out the best way to go about that.

Having tried all three, I have to say that asking someone else, however awkward and annoying you might feel about it, is absolutely the best way to go about it … with some etiquette caveats, of course. Selfies, particularly if your traveling partner is much taller than you are (as mine usually is), can sometimes come out like this:



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Hmmmm … definitely not our best. And camera self-timers are great in a pinch, but it generally takes quite a few shots before you get everything lined up right and have everyone smiling with their eyes open at the exact second the camera takes the photo — let’s just say it can be a bit time consuming.

So, that leaves you with the dreaded travelers conundrum — asking someone else to take your photo.  However, if you don’t want your awesome photo to end up like this:

Machu_Picchu Fail^^ Thanks, lady who took our photo directly in front of the Machu Picchu ruins after we had hiked Huayna Picchu. It’s not like you could have told us we needed to move over to the right a bit in order to get the full effect …

… there are some caveats I would always follow.

The Travelers’ Guide to Asking Someone Else to Take Your Photo

1. Don’t be hasty. There’s really no rush. Take your time to scope out the crowd and see who seems to be taking the most thoughtful, well-placed photos themselves. If they’re careful about the shots they have on their own camera, they’re more likely to be careful with your shots, as well.

2. Be polite. I’ve never actually encountered someone who wasn’t happy to take our photo, although there usually is a bit of nerves that can come along with it. (Hey, it’s a big deal to take a photo for people in a place they may never, ever be again!) Don’t crowd people while they’re busy first experiencing a site, don’t ask the single mom chasing after her kids and don’t ask the couple that you’ve noticed bickering all throughout your tour. I’ve found that apologizing for the interruption tends to go a long way, too, as in: “I’m so sorry to bother you, but would you mind taking our photo quickly?”

3. Show them how to use your camera.  Don’t wait until you check the photos someone has taken to realize they didn’t know how to use your zoom — give them all the important intel up front to avoid any confusion. Make sure the camera is already on and ready (sometimes ours goes into hibernation mode when it’s on and hasn’t been used in a while, and it takes a couple seconds to reboot, which tends to confuse people. I’m aware of this now, and try to make sure the person taking the picture doesn’t have to worry about that) and tell them any and everything they need to know about the flash and your zoom.

4. Be very clear about what you want. This is perhaps the most important part of asking anyone to take your photo — what is it exactly that you want? Perhaps if I had thought of this before having that woman take our photo in front of Machu Picchu, I would have remembered to clarify that we wanted the entire ruins in the picture … not just the trail off to the side. Sigh. Do you want your picture horizontal or vertical, or both? What specifically in the background do you want captured, and where do you want to be in comparison to that background? Does it kill you when people cut your feet off in photos? It doesn’t hurt to ask them to take a couple shots, too, just to avoid the inevitable blink or weird smile that can ruin a photo. Politely inform your snapper of how you want the picture to look, and that will help them frame the perfect shot. Believe me, people want to do a good job, so as long as you’re friendly here, people won’t mind a little direction.

5. Don’t be embarrassed to check it. Most people will offer this anyway, but don’t be afraid to really check the photo after it’s taken. If it’s not exactly what you had in mind, just say: “Oh these are great! But would you actually mind just taking one more quick one that gets that waterfall in the background?” If that’s too embarrassing, wait for that person to leave and start over again with someone else.

6. Always reciprocate. It’s just common traveling courtesy to reciprocate the offer back to someone who has just taken a photo of you. Of course if they accept, be sure to go through all the caveats in reverse so that you can be sure you’re snapping exactly what they want, as well. An even better idea — ask them first if they’d like you to take a picture for them. After you’ve already helped them out, they might feel more inclined to do the same for you.

It may seem like a lot to go through to get one photo, but at the end of the day, if you really don’t think you’ll be making it back to that once-in-a-lifetime place, it’s totally worth it.

Do you guys have any additional tips of your own when it comes to asking people to take your photo for you when traveling?

Bis bald, friends — and happy travels!

Checking out Glenwood Springs and Hanging Lake


Hi friends,

So last Saturday, after checking out Aspen and the Maroon Bells, Chris and I got back in the car and finished up the hour drive over to Glenwood Springs. We would be hiking the Hanging Lake trail early Sunday morning, so we thought staying in town (we stayed at the Courtyard Marriott, which is about a 15-20 minute drive out to Hanging Lake) would be a good idea so we could get an early start.

A little bit about Glenwood Springs — umm, it’s adorable. The downtown area is super cute, and we had a lot of fun meandering about Saturday night. We ended up having dinner at Grind, where Chris said he had the best burger of his life, and my falafel sandwich was pretty spectacular, as well. There are also a ton of hot springs in and around Glenwood Springs (hence the name), including the new Iron Mountain Hot Springs, which Chris and I plan to visit when we make it back to the area and have more time.




03_Grind^^ Falafel sandwich with cole slaw … yum!





We grabbed a bottle of wine and headed back to the hotel for an early night Saturday, since we’d be getting at up 5:30 for our hike the next day.

So a little bit about this hike. I had read a ton of reviews on TripAdvisor about it, all of which say that this hike is incredibly beautiful … but incredibly difficult. Like, every single review says how prepared you need to be and how rocky and hard it is. So, needless to say, I was a little nervous. Having now completed said trail, however, I can tell you — yes, it’s difficult … but not too difficult. Of course my idea of difficult has been increased dramatically (thanks in particular to this hike, and this one and this one), so I’d say that my idea of difficulty might be a bit higher than others, but all I would say is, if you’re interested in doing this hike, don’t let scary reviews keep you from it. Yes it’s steep and yes there are lots of rocks to climb, but there’s plenty of room to take breaks, and there are plenty of flat bits to catch your breathe, as well.

The other note I’d have to make is about the parking lot. It’s tiny, friends — as in not much room for a ton of cars. Chris and I arrived just a little after 7 a.m. to start our hike and probably got one of the last 10 or so spots to park. And when we finished (around 9:20) there was a line of cars waiting to get in, which probably would have been at least an hour or so wait, if not longer. So my advice would be to get there very, very early, so you can avoid all that waiting nonsense.

And when you finally do make it to your hike, you’ll be rewarded with some pretty amazing stuff, friends …


_DSC1314^^ There was something tantalizingly pretty about this moth … even though if I look at it too long it totally grosses me out …


_DSC1344^^ After a mile of uphill hiking, we reached the beautiful Hanging Lake. Quite serene, isn’t it?

_DSC1345^^ The water was so crystal clear and beautiful, and see the fish?!




_DSC1392^^ There’s a short little extra hike that runs up above Hanging Lake that brings you to this pretty waterfall. Definitely worth the extra one minute it takes to get there.





And that was our nice little Sunday, my friends. I would highly recommend every single piece of our weekend. From Aspen to the Maroon Bells to Glenwood Springs to the Hanging Lake trail … it’s all absolutely wonderful.

Bis bald, friends!

A Day Trip to Aspen to Check out the Maroon Bells

01_RoadtoAspen^^ A little view on our way to Aspen last weekend.

Hey friends,

So this past Saturday Chris and I decided to stop off in Aspen on our way to Glenwood Springs to hike the Hanging Lake trail. Aspen’s about four hours away from us in Denver, and neither one of us had been before, but it’s only about an hour from Glenwood Springs, so we figured Saturday would make the perfect time to do a little stop off.

At first we weren’t sure what to check out since we would have limited time, but after a little research, I determined that seeing the Maroon Bells was absolutely what we needed to do. According to some sources, these mountain ranges are the most photographed mountains in all of North American — and now we know why.

During the summer the trail into the Maroon Bells site is closed to individual cars from 8 to 5 p.m. (unless you have a child under 2, or a few other contingencies), but you can catch a bus for $6 per person from Aspen Highlands, and they have free parking for Maroon Bell visitors as well. The parking lot does fill up quickly though, so you kind of need to test your luck. We did get lucky, though, because we arrived around 2 and were able to find a spot right away.

It was meant to be.

Here’s a bit of the (spectacular) views …

02_RoadtoAspen^^ This lake on the way into Aspen was too pretty not to pull off to the side of the road and photograph.

03_Aspen^^ The Aspen Highlands, where we parked and caught the bus into Maroon Bells.



_DSC1224^^ Gorgeous mountain views.





_DSC1257^^ So about these mountains. The Maroon Bells are two peaks in the Elk Mountains — Maroon Peak and North Maroon Peak — separated by about a third of a mile. You can hike them (they’re considered ’14ers’ — aka the name that Coloradans have given to certain mountains in the state that are above 14,000 feet), but the terrain is very difficult, so you should definitely do your research and train beforehand.


_DSC1264^^ There is another little hike, about 3 miles, running away from the mountains, that Chris and I will definitely be back to do at some point in the near future.







_DSC1304^^ Loved these wildflowers!

And that was Maroon Bells, kids. We spent a couple hours there, and then hopped back in the car to finish the hour drive to Glenwood Springs. I’ll be back tomorrow with more on our evening in Glenwood Springs and the Hanging Lake hike.

Until then, bis bald, friends!

Euclid Hall – A Great Place for Awesome Drinks and Appetizers in Denver


Hey friends,

So Friday night Chris and I made good on a promise to each other to try out at least one new bar/restaurant in Denver each month by checking out Euclid Hall, right off Larimer Square. It’s been on my to-do list, and I’m really glad we got a chance to check it out, because we both agree it’s a great spot to bring visitors. Not only do you get to walk through the adorable Larimer Square (which it seems I’m destined to take pictures of every single time I’m in that area, so please don’t judge me), but they have tons of beers and they even have a speciality Seinfeld-themed cocktail menu.


We ordered a couple different beers and cocktails and appetizers, and the atmosphere was really fun and festive. It’s a great place to hang with some friends or have a pre-dinner drink. I would highly recommend checking it out …



IMG_7841^^ The beer list goes on and on …

IMG_7842^^ Seinfeld-themed drinks … yesssssss!

IMG_7845^^ You just know we had to try the pickle sampler plate, right?

IMG_7847^^ Fried cheddar curds with buffalo ranch dipping sauce and white cheddar spaetzle rounded out our appetizer samples. The only other times I’ve had spaetzle were in Salzburg and Munich, so of course you know nothing can compare to eating amazing food in foreign countries — but friends, please believe me when I tell you that this spaetzle seriously gives all other spaetzles a run for their money. De. Lish.

IMG_7849^^ I tried the “They’re Real And They’re Spectacular” drink from the Seinfeld-themed menu (it was pretty awesome — a very mellow drink, if that’s what you’re after), while Chris got the Hipster Dufus.

IMG_7855^^ And, because I promise to always be predictable, the quintessential photo of Larimer Square in all of its quaint cuteness.

IMG_7856^^ It’s the twinkle lights that does it, really. I mean, come on? Throw some twinkle lights up on anything and it looks better immediately, amIright?!

Bis bald, friends!

The 52 Project: July 27, 2015

IMG_7929^^ This weekend was a lot of fun, friends. Chris and I tried out a new neighborhood joint for drinks and appetizers on Friday called Euclid Hall, then we hopped in the car Saturday and drove to Aspen to check out Maroon Bells (above). We only stayed in Aspen for the day, though, then it was on to Glenwood Springs to hike the Hanging Lake trail. I’ll be back throughout this week to explain all of these things in further detail, but for now, go ahead and soak up the gloriousness that is the photo above. Swoon. Bis bald, friends!


The Coors Tour, Backyard Breweries and Bird’s-eye Views in Golden, Colorado

Hi friends,

So this past Sunday, Chris and I decided to make the short drive out to Golden, Colorado. Chris had never been before, and I had only been once when Lisa was visiting, so there were still a lot of things I wanted to try out in the area.

First on that list: A Coors Brewery Tour.

These tours are free, and if you’re lucky you’ll get a fun driver like ours who takes you for a quick loop around Golden and gives you a bit of historical info about the area before heading over the factory. Lisa and I had wanted to take the tour when we were there together, but the line was over an hour to wait, and we felt we could make better use of our time. This time, though, Chris and I went in knowing we’d have a bit of a wait, and it didn’t end up being too bad (probably a little under an hour) after all. A shuttle bus picks you up from the (free) parking lot and drives you over to the factory, which is humongous. The tour is unguided, and you just pick up a headset and press corresponding numbers to display cases as you walk through yourself. I think I probably would have paid more attention had the tour actually been guided, but as it was, the tour was free and it comes with three free beers per person at the end, so really it’s worth doing if you’re trying to kill some time in Golden. (Or if you happen to love Coors beer, of course.)

01_Coors_Sign^^ Waiting in line to catch the shuttle to the factory.

02_CoorsLine_View^^ Everywhere you look in Golden you’ll see gorgeous mountains and blue skies. It’s pretty breathtaking.

03_Coors_Brewing^^ Some barrels during the tour.

03_Hops^^ Delicious beer ingredients.


05_Coors_Drinks^^ The beers available each day are on display as you get down to the cafeteria area. Chris and I collectively tried the staple Coors Banquet, Batch 19 and the Colorado Native. Batch 19 was my favorite, while Chris was partial to the Native.


07_Coors_Factory^^ The reservoir surrounding the factory is used to cool the machines used by the plant.

After the tour (which took us about an hour and a half), we drove over to the adorable Golden City Brewery. This brewery is essentially in a back yard, with picnic tables and wrought iron benches, flags and soft white lights hanging everywhere. The vibe here is so laid back and casual, it’s impossible to not feel like you’re just drinking some beer in your own backyard with friends. I’ve heard there’s usually a food truck parked outside, but there wasn’t one the day we were there. The brewery sells a small assortment of food (hotdogs, pretzels, a meat & cheese plate), but I would definitely recommend eating before you come if you’re hungry.



10_Golden_Brewing^^ Nothing but blue skies, friends.

11_GoldenBrewing_OutdoorShot^^ How cute is this place?!

After the brewery we took the 15-20 drive up the Lariat Loop National Scenic Byway, past Buffalo Bill’s Museum & Grave, to take in some of the breathtaking vistas.




15_Lariat_Loop^^ We drove up the loop for quite a while, and you can see different things from different stops. That’s the city of Golden down there, and in other spots you could even see Denver in the distance.







And that was our lovely little Sunday, friends. The Coors factory, a brewery and a scenic walk/drive? I’d say a weekend doesn’t get too much more Colorado than that ;)

Bis bald, friends!

Have a Happy Friday, Friends!

02_BrooklynDinner^^ Empanadas and fried plantains at Ideya in Brooklyn with friends before flying back to Denver earlier this week.

Happiest of happy Fridays to you, my friends! Chris and I have spent this week getting back into the groove of things (this is especially true for me, since I’d been in New York for 12 days … sheesh!), and this will be a quiet little weekend spent with some friends and checking out a brewery and beer factory (hopefully!) in a nearby town.

Bis bald, friends! Until next week …

01_Subway^^ Every time I return to New York now I end up acting like a total tourist. Our old 6-train subway line from Grand Central to the Upper East Side. Le sigh.

03_Courtney Shower^^ Celebrating a cousin’s impending (second!) baby with dinner at Homegrown Tap & Dough and dessert (ice cream, duh!) from Bonnie Brae Ice Cream, a Denver institution.

04_Penny^^ Coming home to this little lady’s not so bad.

A Sunny Day Spent at Lake Minnewaska



Hi friends,

This past Saturday when I was still in upstate New York, I had a wedding to attend in Tarrytown that didn’t start until 7 p.m., and my sister had slept over at my mom’s the night before … so … we decided to go on a little adventure. We hopped in the car and drove about 40 minutes from Newburgh, through New Paltz, to Lake Minnewaska. Located on the Shawangunk Mountain ridge, the park has tons of hiking trails for any level hiker, waterfalls, places to have a picnic, swim, fish, or even rent kayaks or a canoe.

Steph and I decided to first hike the smaller loop around the lake (probably about two miles in total), and then hang out by the lake for a couple hours to relax.

The views are pretty spectacular, my friends …















It really was a lovely way to spend a Saturday afternoon.

That night it was on to Tarrytown for what was one of the most beautiful weddings we have ever been to at the Tappan Hill Mansion.






Until next time — bis bald, my friends!

The 52 Project: July 13, 2015

Brooklyn_Sunset^^ I feel like this is a very fitting photo to start out this week, as my 12-day trip back to New York comes to a close. Chris and I flew back to Denver this morning after attending a (gorgeous) wedding in Tarrytown on Saturday and spending most of yesterday in the city with friends. The shot above was taken in Brooklyn as we were walking back from dinner with friends. Ah, New York. Will I ever stop missing you so? I’ll be back later this week to blog about a little day trip my sister and I took to Lake Minnewaska. Until then, bis bald, friends!


Warwick Foot Spa and Tea Bar — Plus Some Italian Food to Top It All Off

Happy birthday, Mom!

Last night my sister and I treated our mom for her 60th birthday to the full session, 50-minute foot reflexology treatment at Warwick Foot Spa and Tea Bar, followed by dinner at Grappas Ristorante right down the road.

Full disclosure: I’d never had a reflexology treatment before. Having said that, I do think I’ll be trying to get a few more of these in from time-to-time from now on. The foot reflexology treatment is basically all of my favorite stuff about a massage, without having to actually take all my clothes off, which honestly I just can’t be bothered with. They massage your shoulders and neck, your arms and hands, feet and legs, and cover your eyes with a delicious-smelling warm towel during the whole thing.

It’s pure loveliness.

Dinner at Grappas was Italian, which is of course our favorite. Pasta. Wine. Boston Creme Pie. Grappa. What could be better?



03TeaBar^^ You get tea before your reflexology treatment, too — so cute!


05GrappaRestaurant^^ Whatever in the world kind of cheese this was, I would like it in my life every day, please.

06GrappaRestaurant^^ Eggplant rollatini appetizer.


08GrappaRestaurant^^ This linguini with clams is exactly what everyone needs. Trust me.

09GrappaRestaurant^^ Complimentary shots of grappa at the end of the meal was icing on the cake, so to speak.


It was a successful outing all the way around, my friends. I highly recommend if you’re in the Warwick area!

Chris heads into New York tomorrow (yay!), and we’re hitting up my second wedding in as many weekends on Saturday in Tarrytown.

I can’t wait.

Bis bald, my friends!

Life Recently: The Upstate New York Version

Hey friends,

So I’m back in upstate New York right now, and life has been hectic and totally laid back at the same time here … is that possible? I’m here for two weddings, to celebrate my mom’s 60th birthday and to get some stuff done for my sister’s upcoming bridal shower in August, so all of that is definitely hectic. But when I’m not busy running around, I’m pretty much hanging on the back porch as much as I possible can.

Here’s what I’ve been up to lately:

01Union_Station^^ A gorgeous Union Station the day before I left Denver.

02Grand_Central^^ And an even more gorgeous Grand Central Station the day I arrived back in New York!

03Mom_Porch^^ Views from Mom’s porch.

05Newburgh_Vintage^^ My mom and I had to make a pit stop into Newburgh Vintage Emporium for some stuff, and can I just tell you how much I’m loving this place? If you happen to be in the Hudson Valley, and you like vintage goods, this place is a must-see.

06Newburgh_Vintage2^^ More Vintage Emporium prettiness.

07Abany_Views^^ Saturday’s wedding took place on a rooftop overlooking the Albany skyline. Not too shabby for a fireworks view, eh?

08Me_Steph^^ Me and sissy.

09Steph_Brian_Sparklers^^ My sister and her fiancé — these two.

10Steph_Jenna^^ With the gorgeous bride.

11Baby_Ari^^ Meeting my cousin’s baby for the first time was definitely a highlight of this trip, as well.

12Butternut_Risotto^^ Soon-to-be bro-in-law made me a delicious butternut squash risotto for dinner one night … yum!



15Lobster_Roll^^ Lobster and crab roll at The River Grill in Newburgh.

14Newburgh_Waterfront^^ The Newburgh Waterfront, aka the glorious Hudson River.

Still left to do? A couple bridal shower errands, mom’s 60th birthday excursion (I’ll blog about that later) and another wedding in Tarrytown on Saturday.

Bis bald friends!

The 52 Project: July 6, 2015

Fourth_Fireworks^^ Happy belated 4th of July, everyone! Sorry this photo is so blurry — apparently I am not very good at taking photos of fireworks. Anyway, as I mentioned in my last post, I’m back on the east coast through next weekend to celebrate a couple weddings, and one of those weddings took place this past Saturday on a rooftop, and it included a spectacular view of the fireworks in Albany’s downtown area. I hope everyone else had amazing fourth of July plans — bis bald, everyone!


A Snowboard Summer Camp for Adults

Whistler_5Hi Guys!

So welcome to my sneaky guest post for my snowboard camp that Cheryl mentioned last week.

My adventure all started with this excellent snowboard tutorial site, Snowboard Addiction. If you ever need any tips for progressing your riding, you should 100% check them out, no matter your level — their videos taught me a ton.

Anyway, back in January I got an email from Snowboard Addiction about this snowboarding summer camp in Whistler at Treeline Camps. This snowboard summer camp is held in late June, yes, but as it is located on the Horstman Glacier at the top of Whistler/Blackcomb, there’s snow year round.

To be honest, the thought had never even crossed my mind that something like this would exist, so naturally, when it hit my inbox, I got a little excited. Getting to snowboard in summer would be amazing, and getting taught how to snowboard better by some of best coaches in the world – holy moly!

So after a chat with Cheryl (and a lucky tax return), I signed up and booked my flight to Whistler for the 3-day (half length) adult snowboard camp.

To say it was worth it would be an under statement — what a good time! My only regret was that I didn’t do the full camp. The camp directors, Lisa and Luke, were so incredible, and Lisa even lent me a piece of her bindings when one of my screws fell out, which let me finish my last day of riding on a huge high note vs. a massive bummer.

The coaches were equally awesome: Nev Lapwood (founder of Snowboard Addiction) and Duncan Mainland (a coach that regularly appears in Nev’s videos) had such an excellent way of teaching and instructing … as well as being hilarious.

After three days I certainly saw a lot of progression in my riding, but I also took away a lot of specific things to work on, as well.  This is actually one of the key reasons I thought three days wasn’t quite enough — I didn’t really want to spend the time working on the areas that frustrated me, I mainly wanted to focus on having as much fun as possible, as my time was so short.

I’ll admit this was not the worst problem to have.

Some highlights:

  •  Bears!!! There were literally black bears everywhere.
  • The drive from Vancouver to Whistler = so beautiful!
  • The people. Getting to ride with some people who are as passionate, if not more passionate, than me about snowboarding was so much fun.
  • The Peak to Peak Gondola (and drinking a beer on said gondola) from Blackcomb to Whistler was an amazing ride.








There is a ton of other stuff I could mention as well, but I think this guest post is definitely long enough. So in the words of my lovely wife … Bis Bald Friends!

The 52 Project: June 29, 2015


^^ So we’re two days away from … July?! Can that even be right? Sheesh time flies. I’m gearing up to fly back east this Thursday for a couple weeks to attend some weddings and get some stuff together for my sister’s showers and wedding and to celebrate my mom’s 60th with her … just a whole lot of stuff coming up in the next few months, friends! The photo above was from the Cherry Blossom Festival Chris and I attended with some friends on Saturday. The festival celebrates Japanese culture in Denver, and it took place right outside our building, since the Denver Buddhist Center is right across the street. They had a drum display (above), tons of vendors and great food (yum sushi!). Anyway, hope everyone’s celebrating summer in the most fun and amazing ways. Bis bald, friends!


Gizmos and Goodies: Travel Wiser This Year


Ah, travel. The thought of upcoming trips can always bring a smile to my face. Chris and I have dubbed this our U.S. travel year, since by the end of 2015 we will have added Ohio, Missouri, Kansas, Utah, South Dakota, Wyoming, Montana and Louisiana to our list of been-there states. (This is, of course, in no small part due to our partial cross-country drive out to Denver at the beginning of the year.)

In addition to that, we’ll be traveling to Japan in February of 2016 for Chris to complete his sixth and final race in the 6 World Marathon Majors.

Travel is, obviously, an important thing for us. And while I love collecting travel books, and I tend to keep most maps, tickets and other paraphernalia that we collect while we’re actually on these trips, I’d be lying if I said that technology wasn’t a huge help these days when it comes to traveling. So in honor of all you Weary Wanderers out there, I thought I’d share some of my favorite tech gizmos and goodies that make the road less traveled just a little bit easier.

Here goes nothing.

I’ve had this app for a while now, but since Chris and I just moved to a place where we needed a car at the beginning of this year, I haven’t had a ton of chances to use it yet. Still, I’m excited to use the app when we hit the road for our Wyoming/Montana trip in September. Just type in your zip code on the website or hit the ‘Find Gas Near Me’ button on the app and let the magic of GasBuddy do the legwork to find the cheapest gas wherever you are.

onTime and MyTix
While I probably won’t have a ton of use for these two apps anymore, when I was a New York City dweller, I basically lived by them to get home to visit family. The free onTime app from Metro North Rail provides real-time updates on train departures and arrivals, along with track information, for any route you plunk into its database, while New Jersey Transit’s MyTix allows you to actually purchase, activate and use tickets directly through your smartphone (finally!).

Cool or creepy: Sometimes when I’m just walking around Denver, I’ll hear a little ‘ding’ from deep down in my purse, and I’ll pull out my phone to find that Foursquare is recommending a restaurant (or even a specific dish!) near where I’m standing. Okay, so maybe that’s a little creepy, but you actually don’t have to allow the location access on Foursquare to use it when you’re out and about to search for awesome restaurants, bars and shops near where you are.

Ah, road trips — the staple of American travel, am I right? As I mentioned before, Chris and I only recently needed a car in our lives, but I’ll tell you right now that pretty much nothing about having a car excited me, except for grocery shopping and, of course, road trips! So of course I love the idea behind Roadtrippers and plan to use it a ton for upcoming trips. Plan out an amazing road trip by inputting your start location/end location and start date/end date, and asking the app/site to provide you with information regarding hotels, attraction, natural wonders and/or weird stuff. For example, when I use the app to set me up with a route from Denver to Glacier National Park, I’m told the trip will cost about $157 in gas, should take about 16 hours total and covers approximately 916 miles. Set your destinations, then click the little location icon off to the bottom left of your screen and select what you’d like to find (accommodations/attractions & culture/camping & rv/entertainment & nightlife/food & drink/outdoors & recreation/etc.), and the app will automatically pull up the best options on your drive. For example, on the way out to Glacier National Park Chris and I might stop at Bighorn National Forest, Teapot Rock, Yellowstone Art Museum or the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail, among many others.

PackPoint Packing List Travel Companion
If packing for a big trip stresses you out because you fear you may forget something super important, that’s where PackPoint can help. Download the app and start by picking if you’re a gal or guy. Then input where you’re going and when, then the number of nights you’ll be staying and the type of trip you’ll be having (business or leisure) and activities you plan to do (swimming, snow sports, working, camping, gym, photography, international, beach and baby are just a few of your options, and you can customize activities if you upgrade to the $2 app version, as well). Hit ‘repeat basics’ or ‘laundry’ if you’ll be able to do that on your trip, and the app will generate a suggested packing list for you. You can check off items as you pack and swipe to remove stuff you don’t need. For example, on my trip to Glacier National Park — where I plan to hike, take photos and do lots of walking — my packing list includes things like camera bag, memory cards, battery and my camera, as well as maybe a handheld GPS, water bottle, bug spray and sunscreen. I find the obvious reminders (things like chapstick, pain reliever pills, wallet, house key and reading glasses to be particularly helpful because, let’s be honest, if I’m going to forget something, it won’t be my camera!)

If you’re a person who prefers checking things off on an actual, tangible list, rather than an electronic one (which sometimes I am), try printing this super cute one (in black & white or color) from a pair & a spare. (Her 5,4,3,2,1 packing guide might be helpful, too!)

Bis bald, friends — and happy travels!

Whistler Summer Snowboard Camp — Complete!


Hi friends!

So I picked Chris up from the airport last night after his 5-day summer snowboard camp in Whistler, and I think it’s safe to say he had an amazing time (and may have even actually learned a pretty cool trick or two).

Chris will be back hopefully early next week with his own very special guest post on the experience, but until then, enjoy the view above ;)

Bis bald, friends!

The 52 Project: June 22, 2015

IMG_7361^^ Umm — can you say delicious? I attended a street fair in the Highlands with some friends this past weekend (and a crawfish boil afterwards in the outdoor beer garden area of Local 46, so fun!), and these ridiculous Rice Krispie treats the size of my head were for sale at one of the tables. The people I was with promised they would have a bite if I bought one, but I didn’t believe them, so I abstained. Man, I wish I hadn’t. Bis bald, friends!